Why Arts and Crafts Are Important

Even if your not good at them.

Are you a perfectionist? Or, someone who wants to put their best forward at all times? That isn’t a bad thing, even if I have some trouble relating. Oh, don’t get me wrong I want to put my best foot forward too. I just know that it takes a lot of mistakes to get there, and I’m not afraid of to let my progress be seen. This is where it gets tricky with kids. You need to let your kids see you struggle. So that they understand that it takes time and practice to get good at things. Show them your mistakes.

Why arts and Crafts?


Arts and crafts help children learn all kinds of important lessons. They get to explore their imaginations. Learn small motor skills, and even work through some engineering type problems. Depending on the craft all kids of connections can be made. Learning something new with your child, shows them they are important. It shows them that your not perfect either, and that its okay to struggle.If nothing else, it should be fun and you both end up giggling over how awful they both look! But, your kid may surprise you and have natural talent you never would have found if you hadn’t introduce them.

If nothing else, it should be fun, you both may end up giggling over how awful they both look! And thats okay! But, your kid may surprise you. They may have natural talent you never would have found if you hadn’t introduce them to something new.

Don’t know where to start?

Pinterest is a great resource. Just pick a medium or a subject. Painting, paper, yarn, fabric, these are all mediums. Princess’s, cars, horses, dinosaurs, etc, these are subjects. Let your child see you struggle and learn, but most of make sure your both having fun!

Pinterest Win: Origami Dragon Bookmark

Are you like the rest of us? Scrolling Pinterest looking for a craft or project to do with a group of kids. Maybe you have a theme, maybe not, but you just need something that will fill 10-15 minutes and come out in one piece? Hey I’m on kid three I’ve seen what a classroom or group of kids can fail at. Truth be told its not the kids that failed, its the quality of the craft supplies. Still we want wins for all the kids.

The Craft: An Origami Dragon Corner Bookmark

You can find the original post here: https://www.redtedart.com/dragon-corner-bookmark-design

The Pinterest Effect:

It looks so good on Pinterest. Tons of people are pinning it. But will it really work? Can I really get a group of kids to follow along and end up with a cute craft? Pinterest says you can but we all know Pinterest lies.

I set out to see if this craft was worth doing, by doing it myself. Then I had my 7 year old do it. So far so good. Then I analyzed the possible problems in a group setting with a wide range of ages. (My group of kids was at a Pfarmers Market, so I had no idea who would show up.)

How I Prepped for Success:

What I learned from my test samples helped me decide the best way to prep for this event. This may be different than what you need. For example if you have a classroom full of 3rd graders, then you’ll want them to do some of these steps themselves, a troop, or classroom full of 1st graders may be different.

  • I used cardstock and cut out the rectangles for this project 3in. x 6in.
  • Color and precut the eyes. (I per dragon)
  • Draw and precut the ear piece.
    (I per dragon)
  • Draw and precut the wings.
    (I per dragon)
  • Precut the spikes as one solid piece. To do this I cut a 2in x 2in square and shaped the outside edge on two attached sides, then cute off a 1in x 1 in square from the opposite corner.
  • Use glue sticks on the dragon , not the individual pieces.
  • Stick the ear on last, with instructions to hold it tight for awhile.

Success is in the smiles

I had about 20 kids stop by my tent and make this project, they ranged in age from 2 – 12. The day of the event it became very clear that the younger kids wanted to participate and just couldn’t do the folding. If I had used regular paper, they still would not be able to fold, but thinner paper would have been easier for the 5-7 year olds. So I quickly folded up a small pile of dragons, and the kids had just as much fun, gluing the pieces on.

The project took between 5-10 minutes per child. I personally could walk a group of about 3 through the process, but my table was small. Everyone left my table happy, even if some of the dragons got an extra eye, or some bling from my stash of sticky gems meant for a different craft.